Cobblers get ‘aggressive’ in training after Curle picks the bones out of ‘embarrassing’ Scunthorpe defeat

Keith Curle
Keith Curle

There has been an ‘aggressive nature’ to training this week after Cobblers manager Keith Curle analysed Saturday’s defeat to Scunthorpe United and dished out some honest feedback to his players.

Curle revealed he and his players held a couple of meetings in the early part of the week to pick the bones out of their disappointing performance at Glanford Park and identify where exactly they went wrong in the 3-0 defeat.

If you can be aggressive with your mates and your team-mates, it becomes second nature to then be aggressive to the opposition.

And the Town manager has got the desired response in training having overseen some feisty sessions in the build-up to this weekend’s visit of Salford City.

“We can’t hide away from it,” said Curle. “We’ve had a couple of meetings and we’ve addressed certain issues.

“The lack of aggression in our play has been touched on and as you might imagine there was an aggressive nature to training on Monday and training on Tuesday, which I like.

“Because if you can be aggressive with your mates and your team-mates, it becomes second nature to then be aggressive to the opposition.”

Now the dust has settled and he’s had an opportunity to analyse Saturday’s game with his players, Curle added: “There’s no need to bang players over the head with it but we watched it and some of it is embarrassing and some of the decision-making is embarrassing.

“But you have to deal with it. When the players go out onto the pitch, they know they’ve got to make decisions and they’ve got to be brave enough to make those decisions.

“You’ve got to face the criticism afterwards when there are simpler decisions and better decisions that could have and should have been made and what you find is that good players make good decisions more often than not.”

Asked what concerned him most about the performance, he continued: “Conceding silly goals and the nature of the performance was lacklustre.

“Players were given instructions that were very simple - if they’ve got the ball, we want it so go and get it back, but we stood off them, our distances were wrong and our decision-making was wrong.”