Emergency care training and fundraising on Daventry estate

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A residents’ association for a Daventry estate is celebrating being able to install a defibrillator machine.

The Middlemore Residents’ Association has been working since March 2015 to get funding for the device, which can be a lifesaver if someone has a cardiac arrest.

The device is being installed outside the Select Convenience store off Hardwick Hall Way.

Secretary of the residents’ group, Karen Tweedale, said: “We thought it was important to get a defibrillator on the estate because there are only two others in Daventry – one at the fire station and the other one at Reach For Health on High March. To get to either of those and back to Middlemore, you’re looking at 20 minutes or so which is too long when someone’s had a cardiac arrest.

“We’ve been very lucky in that we got a £500 grant from our county councillor Malcolm Longley to pay for the defibrillator, which is subsidised by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). Daventry Town Council agreed to give £690 to pay for the secure cabinet. Glen from GB Electricals installed it for a knock-down price. And of course Davinder at the shop who agreed to have it on his building.”

Once up and running, people dialing 999 after someone had a cardiac arrest or similar incident, can be directed by the emergency call handler to the device and given the code to access it.

Instructions on how to use the device are included, and it can even tell if the patient needs an electrical shock or not meaning the person operating it needs no medical knowledge.

The residents’ association is now encouraging people on Middlemore to sign up to CPR training being offered.

Karen said: “The BHF does a community training project which provides the equipment to train 10 people to potentially save a life. The idea is those 10 then take their kit away with them and pass on the knowledge to family and friends.

“We will also be raising money at the estate’s summer fun day on June 12 which will be used partly to fund the up-keep of the defibrillator – batteries and pads, those kinds of things – and the rest will be going to the British Heart Foundation.