Stan the runaway sea eagle is happy to blow with the wind

Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson took this picture of the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71
Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson took this picture of the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71
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FALCONERS are continuing in their attempts to recapture Warwick Castle’s runaway sea eagle Stan at a farm in Badby, Northamptonshire - luring him back with the promise of snacks and a companion.

But Stan, a white tailed sea eagle used in the castle’s falconry displays, is seemingly enjoying spreading his wings and is happy to go whichever way the wind blows.

Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson took this picture of the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71

Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson took this picture of the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71

The feathered runaway escaped last week and was seen at Leamington Rugby Club and again close to the Fosse Way, before shaking off his pursuing handlers over the weekend.

On Sunday morning he touched down at Staverton Lodge near Badby, where farmer Roger Teverton heard squawking that morning, before finding the bird breakfasting on the carcass of a dead sheep when he went shepherding.

Mr Teverson, who did not know of Stan’s escape, nonetheless recognised the raptor as not being native to Warwickshire.

And the busy farmer only found out Stan belonged to Warwick Castle when he popped out to buy flowers for his mother’s birthday on Monday.

Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson who spotted the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71

Warwick Castle's sea eagle Stan has been seen at Staverton Lodge farm near Badby. Farmer's Son Roger Teverson who spotted the bird while out feeding his stock.'MHLC-18-09-12 sea eagle SEP71

He called the castle and the bird’s grateful handlers began their efforts to recapture their quarry on Tuesday.

They are now at the farm and using rabbits and a friend to lure Stan back to captivity.

By leaving rabbits out, and having Sidney, one of the castle’s bald headed eagles, feed on them, handlers hope to tempt Stan back with a snack.

But with plenty of wild rabbits as well as the unfortunate sheep in his belly, Stan is happy to remain at large.

A Warwick Castle spokesman said: “He won’t come back to his handler unless he’s hungry so as a bird he’s quite enjoying his time in the wild.

“The frustrating thing for his handlers is that whatever direction the wind is blowing, he’s taking that path.”

Mr Teverson, who describes himself as ‘quite into’ birds of prey, does not blame Stan for the sheep’s demise, although he believes the bird could kill a lamb.

He said: “It’s absolutely huge.

“At first I thought it was a big dog eating the sheep because it makes the sheep look small.

“You could get to within ten feet or so of it but then it will fly away. Its wingspan is enormous.”

White tailed sea eagles, which can have a wingspan of more than 7ft, were once native to the UK and have been reintroduced to the Western Isles of Scotland.

But Stan is not native to these shores and gained his name because he is originally from Kazakhstan.