Service to make end of church restoration

MHDE-11-05-11 CHURCH MAY22 (2)'Restoration work, is about to start on St Margarets Church, Crick.'Pictured are the friends of St Margarets - Dave Milne '( Chairman ), Sue Milne ( Secretary ), Jean Garner '( Committee member ), Loraine Winn ( Committee member ) & Ann Ward ( Treasurer )
MHDE-11-05-11 CHURCH MAY22 (2)'Restoration work, is about to start on St Margarets Church, Crick.'Pictured are the friends of St Margarets - Dave Milne '( Chairman ), Sue Milne ( Secretary ), Jean Garner '( Committee member ), Loraine Winn ( Committee member ) & Ann Ward ( Treasurer )

A celebration service will be held to mark the end of phase one of restoration work on an historic village church that was in serious danger.

St Margaret’s Church in Crick will be holding the event on Sunday May 5 after two years of work on the listed building.

Sue Milne, from the Friends of St Margaret, said: “We started fundraising seven years ago, and the work started two years ago.

“Phase one saw work done to the stonework of the tower, we had the weather vane re-gilded with two layers of gold leaf. The two clock faces were also re-gilded. Work was also done to four of the five windows that needed restoration.

“It’s cost us something over £400,000. It would have been less and finished sooner but our original contractor went under so we had to get another, and that involved extra costs. And then we had lead stolen from the roof which wasn’t insured because the scaffolding was still up.”

But the end of the current phase of work does not mark the end of the project.

Mrs Milne said: “You can’t stop work on a new building, let alone one this old.

“We have one more window to do, and on the west end there are some stone carvings that are so badly crumbling we have no idea what they originally looked like. So we will be continuing with our fundraising to do all these other jobs.”

The service takes place on May 5 starting at 6pm and the Bishop of Brixworth will be there.

Mrs Milne said: “We’ve invited people who have helped the project but anyone can come along. It will be hymns old and new and we want to show that the church community, like the building, is being constantly renewed and isn’t set in stone!”

There has been a place of worship on the site of St Margaret’s for 1,300 years.The first Saxon wooden church was replaced in 1077 with a Norman church and additions have been made ever since. The building suffered at the hands of Parliamentary troops on their way to the Battle of Naseby. Stained glass, frescoes and rich altar hangings were all destroyed.