New Daventry bin collection partnership agreed as district council gains greater influence over environmental services

Councillor Jo Gilford and Norse Commercial Services managing director Dean Wetteland (front) with (from left) DDC chief executive Ian Vincent, DDC's contracts and performance manager Julie Lewis and Norse Commercial Services group directors Mark Emms and Justin Galliford.
Councillor Jo Gilford and Norse Commercial Services managing director Dean Wetteland (front) with (from left) DDC chief executive Ian Vincent, DDC's contracts and performance manager Julie Lewis and Norse Commercial Services group directors Mark Emms and Justin Galliford.

Daventry District Council has signed the contract which will see them enter into a partnership giving them greater influence on how bin collections and environmental services are delivered.

The joint venture with Norse Commercial Services is a 10-year agreement which will launch on June 4, 2018, immediately after the council’s current deal with Enterprise/Amey ends.

Norse, owned by Norfolk County Council, already provides services with 15 other authorities, including Wellingborough, and the new contract will see both parties share ownership and control.

Councillor Jo Gilford, environment portfolio holder at Daventry District Council said: "The Enterprise contract was a traditional contract and it’s difficult to implement changes. Going into this new groundbreaking Norse partnership it means we retain influence to effect changes should the public be aware of anything that’s not going quite right.”

Norse managing director Dean Wetteland said: "It’s a genuine partnership, the board is split between the council and Norse Commercial Services. There’s a full say by the council in what we want to do with the services which gives it the flexibility.

"If you go to a complete outsourcing option then you have a contractual arrangement, you’ll sit there for seven years trying to change that contractual arrangement which can be very difficult or very costly. Under this arrangement, if the council needs to make a change it can and we can agree it together.”

He added: “It’s not just if things aren’t going right, it’s if things change. Recycling changes, new technology comes up or new ways to recycle or new disposal streams. By having this arrangement we can adapt around them at a quick pace.”

Also part of the deal is the capacity to trade and go after additional work, which can bring external income in which Norse would share with the council.

Daventry Norse will be introducing new waste and recycling collections to all households when the new contract starts next summer. Under the new 1-2-3 collection service, food waste will be collected weekly, a two-weekly wheelie bin collection for co-mingled recycling will be introduced to replace the weekly box collections of sorted recyclables and the black bin will be collected every three weeks. Households will also be able to opt-in to a fortnightly garden waste service for an annual fee.

District residents will see their recycling boxes replaced by 240-litre bins which have a similar base size.

The new-look service was agreed by the council in July last year following public consultation and a wide-ranging review of future waste and recycling options launched in summer 2015.

Cllr Gilford said the system is a lot easier because it got rid of the boxes, which residents had complained about often being to small.

“Through consultation, we can look at what’s best for Daventry and come to the most suitable arrangement to do so," said Mr Wetteland on whether or not a change to the 1-2-3 system could be made in future.

The venture will also involve investment in facilities and equipment for environmental services, including a fleet of brand new vehicles, machinery and equipment.

The redevelopment of the environmental depot and offices at High March Daventry is already underway and will see significant changes made to the transfer station on the site.

Further details on how collections will change for residents will be available early next year.

Mr Wetteland said: “There’s a transition period so there’s going to be some flexibility. If for the first couple of weeks people still leave their box out we’re not just going to leave it behind, we are going to pick it up, we are going to empty it.

"There will be a point in time where we’re going to have to say no but we will work with and assist people as much as we can to give them time to get it right.”

The new venture will deliver the following services:

- Waste and recycling collections for households and businesses

- Street cleaning – litter picking and street sweeping on public roads and paths, emptying litter and dog bins

- Grounds maintenance, such as cutting grass and maintaining trees, bushes on roadsides and Council land and maintaining play equipment

- Clearing fly-tipping and removing graffiti in public areas

- Maintaining Daventry Country Park

- Operating Daventry Market and public toilets in Daventry town centre

- Preparing burial plots