Ambulance service distributes defibrillators for public to use

Ian Reynolds, community resuscitation trainer from East Midlands Ambulance Service and Martyn Emberson, Northamptonshire chief fire officer with a defibrillator which has been positioned outside Earls Barton Fire Station.
Ian Reynolds, community resuscitation trainer from East Midlands Ambulance Service and Martyn Emberson, Northamptonshire chief fire officer with a defibrillator which has been positioned outside Earls Barton Fire Station.
0
Have your say

Thousands of pounds has been spent by East Midlands Ambulance Service on heart defibrillators for the general public to use.

The service will install 17 of the heart devices at fire stations, including Daventry’s, in a move to try and get help to patients sooner.

However, the announcement of the machines came just days before EMAS said it was to downgrade Daventry’s ambulance station to a community station.

When someone’s heart has stopped beating, a defibrillator can give the heart an electric shock to allow effective cardiac rhythm to be re-established

Sarah-Jayne Parsons, EMAS community defibrillation officer for Northamptonshire, Leicestershire and Rutland said: “Nationally ambulance services are required to get to 75 per cent of life-threatening emergencies within eight minutes of the call being picked up.

“However, when it comes to cardiac arrest, seconds count and the use of a defibrillator while our crews travel to the scene can save a life.

“The defibrillators are stored in bright yellow cabinets which clearly state that the emergency equipment is available there. They are registered with our emergency operations centre so when we receive a 999 call reporting a cardiac arrest we can tell the caller where the defibrillator is located.”

The defibrillators are designed with instructions, both verbal and pictorial, to allow anyone to use them. They even check the patient’s heart before deciding whether a shock is needed.

Councillor Andre Gonzalez de Savage, cabinet member for fire from Northamptonshire County Council said: “This will make it easier for someone reporting a cardiac arrest to get hold of one of these life-saving machines as quickly as possible, potentially saving valuable time while waiting for an ambulance crew to arrive.”