Community invited to help choose public art for Daventry estate

The designs will be on display at the Middlemore Farm Pub until May 21
The designs will be on display at the Middlemore Farm Pub until May 21
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Have your say

A Daventry estate will be decorated with a piece of public art later this year and the decision on its design has been opened to the public.

Artist Wendy Briggs has been working with the Daventry community, including local schools, in recent months to come up with concepts for the art which will adorn the Middlemore estate.

It has resulted in the creation of five different designs exploring a range of themes including nature and the elements, Daventry’s history and Middlemore’s farming past.

Wendy said: “I was inspired by the idea of settlement, where people establish a community, so I developed the designs on themes related to this and represented them as cycles of nature and the passage of time.

“The discussions and feedback from the local people I met during the workshops was invaluable to the design process and I have endeavoured to meet as many of their preferences and suggestions as possible.

“I hope that many people will take the opportunity to have their say, by joining in and voting for their favourites.”

The final design options include a harvest ring sculpture, a rain tree with a bench, a sundial, a meeting place with a footprint trail, and a hidden histories trail.

A display at the Middlemore Farm Pub until Sunday May 21 will give the community an opportunity to look at the designs in more detail and vote for their favourites.

Information leaflets and voting forms are being delivered to residents across Middlemore and are also available from the reception at Daventry District Council’s Lodge Road offices.

Depending on the designs people prefer, it may be possible to install more than one within the project’s budget.

The district council is overseeing the project, money for which has come from three of the housing developers who built the estate as part of their planning obligations. The money can only be spent on a piece of public art.

Whichever designs are chosen, the community will have an opportunity to take part in their creation.

This could be through devising routes for a trail, contributing information about the area’s history, or having their footprint reproduced in slate or brass for the meeting place design.

Bedfordshire-based Wendy has been keen throughout the project to involve local people directly in her design work, via workshops and other public events.

There will be a chance to meet her at the pub and ask any question about her designs on the afternoons of Saturday 13 and Sunday 21 May.