Boats steam in for weekend’s historic festival in Braunston

Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green
Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green
0
Have your say

The waterways around Braunston were busy over the weekend, and filled with the sounds of old engines.

The Braunston Historic Narrowboat Rally took place over the weekend at Braunston Marina, celebrating the more traditional side of boating.

Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green

Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green

This was the 13th year the event had been held.

More than 80 historic boats took part in the event, which featured parades of the boats with commentary.

While the changeable weather kept visitors on their toes, there was plenty to entertain over the two days of the event, and indeed beforehand too.

There were traditional large cargo-type boats steaming along, and smaller ones too taking part in the rally and the parades along the canal.

Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green

Historic boats steam around Braunston on Sunday during the boat parade. Photos by Michael Green

As well as the historic boats on the water, there was a real ale tent, exhibitors, traders and waterways artists, an open-air ‘songs of praise’ church service on the Sunday, live music from bands and groups and Morris dancing, plus food and refreshments.

Poet Luke Kennard, recently appointed Canal Laureate, was ‘in residence’ at the rally, writing and sharing poetry, including one about the boat voted best in show.

Ahead of the rally, Thursday night saw the world premiere of What’s Good for The Goose? in the rally’s beer tent.

The rural comedy was prsented by the Day-Star Theatre and tells the story of a village community suddenly facing the loss of income from farm land rented out to raise money for the community, and the inevitable interest of a property developer who takes a shine to the estate lands, and the village pub called The Goose.